Harvest Home and Ritual 2014

On Tuesday 23rd it is the great feast of Harvest Home, also known as Mabon or the Autumnal Equinox. I am again using a ritual from ADF Solitary Druid Fellowship. A Naturalistic Pantheist ritual can be found on my ritual page here. I will be using the following in the “explanation” part of the ADF ritual but this can also be used for the Naturalistic Pantheist one too.

Say: “As I stand here on this celebration of Harvest Home, the Autumnal Equinox, the sacred wheel of the year continues to turn. As my ancestors did in times before and my descendants may do in times to come, I honour the old ways. Today is the day of balance, of equal light and dark. The sun has begun to wane while the nights grow steadily longer and the weather becomes cooler. We head towards winter. It is the time of the second harvest, the harvest of fruits, of apples, nuts and grapes. Change is all around. The leaves are turning beautiful colours, the birds are preparing for migration and the squirrels are gathering their foods for winter. I give thanks for the abundant gifts of the Earth Mother.”

Celebrating the Full Moon – Harvest Moon – Sept 2014

Ancient people’s considered the Moon to be a deity. For the Romans, she was the goddess Luna, while for the Norse and Anglo Saxons, he was the god Mani or Mona. Today is the Full Moon. I call it Harvest Moon because now is the time of the harvest. Farmers are busily gathering in the crops of the year, we are able to get produce from our allotments and gardens, and wild berries & other plants are all ready to eat. The moon gives farmers light throughout the night. It can also be called the Corn Moon. There are eight phases in the lunar cycle – from the new moon to the full moon and back again. The moon is very important for life on earth – especially for controlling the tides (natures recycling plan).

In ancient times, many cultures planned their calendars by the moon and there are still farming communities today who plant according to it. The metonic cycle of 19 years is the time it takes for the lunar and solar calendars to come together in sync and that might be why 19 years is mentioned in Druidry.

I think the best times to celebrate the lunar cycle are at the full moon and the new moon. The full moon is a time of thanksgiving. It is a good time to get together with family or friends, have a big feast with lots of moon shaped foods e.g. fajitas or pizza, create a full moon altar or go to a local water source to watch the tides. It is also considered a time for peace, so it is a good day to spend focusing on helping the community and working for peace locally or globally. Other possibilities include researching and learning more about the moon or indulging your creative side (often the moon is seen as feminine and creativity is often seen as a feminine attribute) e.g. by writing poetry.

There are many ways to celebrate the Full Moon as Naturalistic Pantheists. Do you celebrate it in your practice? What do you do?

Seasonal Food UK – September

Seasonal foods in September are -

- Aubergines
– Beetroot
– Broccoli
– Cabbage
– Carrots
– Cauliflower
– Celery
– Chard
– Courgettes
– Watercress
– Cucumber
– Fennel
– Garlic
– Kohl Rabi
– Lettuce
– Marrows
– Mushrooms
– Onions
– Peas
– Peppers
– Potatoes
– Radishes
– Red Cabbage
– Rocket
– Runner Beans
– Spinach
– Spring Onions
– Squash
– Sweetcorn
– Tomatoes
– Turnips
– Blackberries
– Blueberries
– Bramley Apples
– Pears
– Plums
– Raspberries
– Brussel Sprouts
– Chillies
– Damsons
– Kale
– Leeks
– Mangeout
– Spring Greens
– Cos Lettuce

Pilgrimage

So today I have went for a day out walking on Dartmoor. If anyone has seen the film Earth Pilgrim by Satish Kumar, you will know he refers to his visits to Dartmoor as a pilgrimage. There are good reasons why. Heading up to that barren landscape dotted with million year old rocks surrounded by heather and gorse as far as the eye can see, it feels like you are entering another world – a spiritual place. Man has lived and worked on Dartmoor since at least the bronze age and so the land contains the memories of many ancestors. The moors are dotted with rivers, sacred places to honour the deity that is nature.

For me, my trips to Dartmoor are a pilgrimage – a way to learn about, honour and explore nature, quite often in a wild state. Climbing the rocks is a prayer, paddling in streams is a meditation and walking the expanses is worship.

Do you have any favourite wild places you visit as a pilgrimage, to honour the natural world around us?

Here’s a couple of photos from my pilgrimage today…

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Finally, here is a nice video about Dartmoor…

Celebrating the New Moon – August 2014

Ancient people’s considered the Moon to be a deity. For the Romans, she was the goddess Luna, while for the Norse and Anglo Saxons, he was the god Mani or Mona. Today is the New Moon. There are eight phases in the lunar cycle – from the new moon to the full moon and back again. The moon is very important for life on earth – especially for controlling the tides (natures recycling plan).

In ancient times, many cultures planned their calendars by the moon and there are still farming communities today who plant according to it. The metonic cycle of 19 years is the time it takes for the lunar and solar calendars to come together in sync and that might be why 19 years is mentioned in Druidry.

I think the best times to celebrate the lunar cycle are at the full moon and the new moon. The new moon is a great time for going stargazing and focusing on our relationship with the universe. It’s also a time for meditation and inner reflection. It is a time to look back over the past month to evaluate it and to make plans and goals for the next. Its also a time for cleaning your house or altar. Pouring a libation to the Moon at this time can also be a good practice.

In Hellenic Reconstructionism, the new moon is a very important time and three days of celebration are often held. The first day (the day before) is Hekates Deipnon, when one honours Hekate as bringer of life. Homes are prepared for the transition and it is a time of purification of self, home and one’s affairs. A meal offering is given to Hekate either on an altar or at a crossroads. Something is also given to those less fortunate. Meanwhile, the fridge and altar are also cleaned. Day two is Noumenia, the first day of the visible new moon, when Selene and Hestia are honoured. It is the start of the month so they ask for blessings on the household. The home is decorated with seasonal flowers and there is a big feast. It is also the time to create a list of goals for the month. Finally, the third day is Agathos Daimon when there is a libation to the personal household or family spirit (often personified as a snake) and prayers for continued blessings on the family. As it is also associated with Dionysus, the celebrations are finished with a small glass of wine.

There are many ways to celebrate the New Moon as Naturalistic Pantheists. Do you celebrate it in your practice? What do you do?